WordPress: In crisis

One of the selling points for (the free software that is) WordPress is its user friendliness. Intuitive, accessible, open—all of these words are at the root of what WordPress is and why it is of such benefit to the publishing world. I largely agree with this.

That said, I know I am an insider (albeit peripherally) to the WordPress community, so need to remember that I am an unreliable narrator of WP’s story. I’ve taken a critical eye to WordPress before, and I’m inspired to do so again from the wonderful book “Design for Real Life” by Sara Wachter-Boettcher and Eric Meyer. Comprised of examples of developer choices in language and quirkiness that hurt people in real-life, the book’s thesis aims to shift design thinking toward creating technology that is less assumptive, less witty, and therefore, less alienating.

In choosing to examine WordPress—specifically its onboarding process—I’m not out to indict the product in any way. I know WP well, make my living from it, and honestly, when something powers 26% of the internet, there exists the most potential to influence the web dev industry through leading by example.

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The AUX of WP: Rethinking the WordPress Writing Experience

Before I was a web professional, before all the project management, front-end coding, and CMS rejiggering, I was an English major. My BA is in writing and, as such, I tend to approach most things I do from the stance of an author.

That being said, the Author User Experience (AUX) of WordPress has been on my mind for a while now. To me, regardless of use, WordPress is about sharing content: articles, images, audio, video. Specifically, WordPress is all about words. It’s right in the name and everything! Continue…